Sunday, February 23, 2014

Splish splash groan


In order to train for our big 85k race in New Zealand, we ran 8 miles on Friday to pre-fatigue, and then 30 miles on Saturday. We decided to re-use a route (that was already stolen) with lots of elevation change, so we did the Trail Factor course. It rained hard from start to finish. So hard that the only sound was the splashing of our shoes in the puddles and impromptu streams. So hard that there were lots of downed trees and mini mud slides. So hard that it was difficult to run on the sloshy, slippery trail.
Deck the halls with boughs...
 We weren't sure if it was the rain or the run from the previous day, but we were both tired and slowed way down. So slow that after about 5 hours into it, we decided to avoid the run up Firelane 5 and back down Saltzman, to leave out some climb. A little while past that, we realized that we had miscalculated and knocked off too much mileage.  So we added another little up-and-down. I had to walk most of the uphill, while eating the last of my food.

Old friend down
We were both ravenous and ate far more than usual. We were also far more tired than usual-- for most of the rest of the week! Was it the rain and our bodies trying to stay warm? Or the additional fatigue of the previous day's run? We're not sure, but hopefully we won't have the combination again for a long time.

Saturday, February 8, 2014

10 miles in the snow

Friday morning run - only a few inches

We have been pretty fortunate to have a pretty mild winter in Portland so far, it has been so nice in fact that it almost felt like spring. But that all changed on Thursday around 11am, snow started to fall and hasn't stopped much since. Susan and I had a 20+ mile run planned for Saturday, which I wasn't sure was going to happen or if it would just turn into a snowshoe trip.

Friday 
Friday

Since I live a 1/4 mile from a trailhead I did a quick trial run on Friday. The snow was light and fluffy and a lot to run in, though I was wishing I was snowboarding in it instead of running. Forest Park being covered in several inches of snow was gorgeous, my own private winter wonderland. I knew we would have a lot of fun on Saturday, as long as Susan could make it to my house.
Friday morning - you can still see the
pole for the trail sign
Saturday morning - the pole is almost
completely covered with snow

Saturday morning I got the text from Susan that she was on her way to my house. Yay! I took a quick glance outside and realized a lot more snow had accumulated over night and that our run was going to be quite a bit different than my Friday run in 2 inches of snow. There was probably 6-7 inches of snow on the trails and only one other crazy person ahead of us breaking trail. The uphills felt like they took 3 times the effort than normal, maybe the whole run did but the uphills really stand out in my mind. We decided to only do 10 miles instead of 20 because of the amount of snow and the difficultly running in it. And I swear that running 10 miles in that amount of snow is like running 20+ miles normally. As soon as we got to the 5 mile mark and started to head back the snow started coming down pretty steadily, which really validated our decision to cut the run short.

Snow selfie

We had a lot of fun on our 10 mile snow slog and stayed warm enough for most of the run. I am happy that we don't have to do this every weekend in the winter but once or twice a year it is fun. But I am looking forward to snowboarding in the snow tomorrow instead of running in it, again.

Susan getting snow out of her shoe






Saturday, February 1, 2014

A different start

"We are going to meet at FL1 on hwy 30 behind la quinta" began the subject line of Ann's email. I'm not sure why, but I wasn't surprised. I had suspected we would start from that odd trailhead in its junky, industrial location. Hidden behind a hotel you wouldn't want to visit and starting with a concrete Jersey barrier, you would never know it's there-- and you certainly wouldn't be tempted to follow the gravelly path-- unless you had taken it before.


Mt Hood and the sun rising as we start to climb FL1
We must have talked about the one time we ran it-- with Willie McBride of Animal Athletics, during their Mountain Goat Hill Running series (which, by the way, was fantastic)-- during our long run the previous weekend. Once stirred awake, the memory of that long, rambling, rarely-traveled trail could not be dismissed. Sure, it's a climb, but most of it is rolling and runnable, and it's just so different from other fire lanes and most of Forest Park's trails that it is utterly charming.

Ann at the very top of FL1
Ann's route took us all the way up Fire Lane 1 to the top; it's rare and fun for us to bag the entire length of a trail like that. Even better, when we got up to Leif Erikson, about halfway up, we saw a group of three runners who said hello... and then recognized our friends! It was wonderful to see their smiling faces and chat for a few minutes before we all got cold and continued on our runs. The serendipity renewed my legs for the steep part of the climb up to Wildwood and beyond, to NW 53rd Dr. Then we got to take Morak down-- one of my favorites because it's ridiculously short (.08 mi) and pointless, with a name like an alien.

The perfect picnic spot on FL4
From there we did a good, regular loop, but from Maple we took Fire Lane 4 all the way back down to its trailhead off Highway 30-- a section and trailhead we had never done. There was a flat, grassy landing partway down FL4 that was open, with gorgeous views. In the sunshine, under the open blue sky, it would make the perfect spot for a picnic or a rest. I snapped a photo and we vowed to return.

Mt Rainier, stunningly clear
The lower trailhead of FL4 connected with Saltzman-- a neat loop and another new section of trail for us. Then we had to climb all the way back up to Wildwood, and up my nemesis hill between mile markers 13 to 11, before bombing down FL1 to the end. That was the plan, anyway, but some of the steepness, parts of the path still icy, and those rolling hills that on the way up had provided welcome downhill... well, all of that made for a painful but adventurous end. What a route! It had a little bit of everything and a lot of great, challenging climbs. Definitely my favorite route in a long time.

Trail sign without a trail name

fl1 - 53rd 2.29
fl1 - morak .08
morak - ww .10
ww - alder 1.3
alder - leif .84
leif - maple 2.7
maple - fl4 .97
fl4 - saltzman .34 
saltzman - maple .45
maple - leif 1.28
leif - fl7A 1.6
fl7a - ww .25
ww - fl1 (22 - 11.20) 8.8
fl1 - car 1.96
total 22.96


Orcas Island 50k

Me coming up Mt. Constitution 
I signed up for the Orcas Island 50k as a solo run months ago when it looked like Susan wasn't going to be able to come to New Zealand to run the Tarawera 60k with me. I felt that mentally I needed to run a 50k by myself, so I wouldn't be as anxious about running Tarawera solo. The timing of the Orcas Island 50k was perfect, just a little over a month before Tarawera, plus it was being put on by Rainshadow Running. James and his team from Rainshadow Running put on some of the best trail races in the Pacfic Northwest. 

Oh me of little faith, Susan as able to get work, a family vacation and New Zealand all to line up and work out. But by this time that Orcas Island 50k was sold out, so she couldn't join me, and we had also changed from the Tarawera 60k to the 85k, I knew the 8400 feet of elevation gain on the Orcas Island 50k was going to be good training for Tarawera, but it still didn't make it any easier mentally knowing she wouldn't be joining me. I know people run 50ks and longer by themselves all the time and I do run without Susan, but why would I want to if I didn't have to? We have so much fun running together and when one of us hits a mentally hard part in a run / race the other one is there to help pull the other one out. It is like we are each other's pacers. 


Race Weekend:
My sister, biggest fan and supporter, Courtney, spent the weekend with me on Orcas Island. Courtney has been at more of my finish lines than I can count. Courtney and I also spent a long weekend on Orcas a few years ago in a tiny yurt at Doe Bay, which somehow our theme song for the weekend became, Ottis Redding's "Sitting on the dock of the bay". We were both looking forward to another weekend together on Orcas, but this time renting a house with separate beds. Which ironically the house had very long dock across the street from it. The song came up several more times over the weekend. 
our "dock of the bay"



Race Day:
I decided to do the early start for the race, I figured I would finish before the normal cut off time, but I want to be able to spend more time with Courtney and this is a seriously tough course. I can't tell you how nervous I was in the morning, and it wasn't about the distance it was about running solo. I felt a little more at ease when I walked into the lodge before the start and spotted Ben another runner from Portland. He introduced me to several other women all named Ann(e). A few minutes later we all lined up at the start and we were off.

I think this bridge was the only "flat" part of the course, and it isn't even really flat.
We started off with a bit of single track downhill before hitting the pavement which went uphill for several miles. A lot of people started to walk at this point and I knew I could run it, but I knew this was a hard course with 2 major climbs at the end and I should probably the the lead of most people and walk the hill. I was still feeling pretty anxious about my solo 50k, so I started to chat with some people to take my mind off things. Around mile 5 we got to the top of the hill and people started to bomb down pass me, which was a little nerve racking, again the little mental voice popped up asking, "why I was I doing this race without Susan, what do I have to prove?" I told myself all I had to do was make it to the aid station at mile 6.4 and I could call Courtney to come get me at the next aid station.

One of the several lakes the race runs by.
Cell coverage on Orcas is a little spotty, but I actually was able to text Courtney and tell her I wanted to drop out and asked her to pick me up at the next aid station. She said she would be there. At that point I knew all I had to do was make it another 8.2 miles to the next aid station. Somehow all of a sudden I was in a much better mood. I ran and chatted with a few guys for awhile and finally passed them, then I got passed by Hal Koerner and I was on cloud 9. I started doubting my decision to drop out, but then I thought at some point everyone has to have a DNF and it would make for an interesting blog post. Then I got to the aid station and realized there was no way Courtney could drive to the aid station and of course there wasn't any cell coverage.

At that point I was almost half way done with the race and I knew if I just thought about running 15 miles alone I could make it. So I started down the hill and kept checking my phone for coverage, after a few failed text messages, a call came through from Courtney, she said she couldn't make it to the aid station without hiking to it, but she would (she is the best). I told her not to worry about it that I would see her at the end, but it was probably going to take a bit longer than I expected.

sign to the summit of Mt. Constitution - the last hill
After several glorious miles of downhill, I had to tackle the 2 kick-you-in-the-ass hills. First was the powerline hill, which there isn't even any point in trying to run it, some parts are so steep it is almost impossible to walk up them. The next hill goes up to Mt. Constitution, which was a little more runnable, I ran what I could and was so happy to reach the top and see the amazing aid stations volunteers. That is when I knew I was going to make it. One of the volunteers told me it was a few miles downhill followed by a few flat miles and a little hill at the end. With that in mind, I took off.

Snow on the way up one of the hills 
View from the top of Mt. Constitution 
30+ minutes later I was still running downhill and wondering when I was going to hit the flat part and if this race was ever going to end. A few minutes later I saw the road and a sign that said 1 mile to Camp Moran, but I wasn't running on the road and the trail didn't look like it ran parallel with the road either. I was hoping the trail didn't snake around back into the forest and I still had several miles to go. Luckily that wasn't the case, soon I was running into what looked like an overflow parking lot and started going up a small hill. I was so spent that I started to walk up the hill, when a woman said to me you are almost there, run! And as soon as I started to run "Dock of the Bay" came on my iPhone and I saw the finish line, then I heard "Go Ann, go!" I saw my sister and ran across the finish line and gave her big hug and cried.

The Orcas Island 50k was one of the most beautiful courses I have ever run, definitely one of the hardest and the most mentally challenging. This race was all mental for me. But I proved to myself I can run a 50k without Susan, so now I don't have to do that again.

Random Orcas Island photo


Random Orcas Island photo